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Why Western Red Cedar?

Dimensional Stability - Cedar offers low density and shrinkage factors, and exceptional thermal insulation value.

Workability - Cedar is easy to cut, form, glue and finish.

Natural Preservative - Cedar contains natural preservatives that resist moisture, decay and insect damage. Flame Spread and Smoke Development Ratings - Cedar exceeds safety classifications and does not require preservative treatments.

All-Weather - Cedar is naturally at home in the sun, rain, heat and cold all year round.

Dimensional Stability Western Red Cedar has twice the stability of most commonly available softwoods. The stability is a result of its low density and shrinkage factors. It lies flat, stays straight, and holds fastenings tightly.

Workability Western Red Cedar produces long, lightweight lengths of timber with a fine, straight grain and uniform texture that make it easy to cut, saw and nail with common tools. These features also contribute to its ability to be planed to a smooth surface or machined to any pattern. The lack of pitch and resin allows Western Red Cedar to hold glue bonds from a wide range of adhesives and provide a firm base for many types of paints and stains.

Natural Preservative Western Red Cedar is one of the world's most durable woods. Natural resistance to moisture, decay and insect damage has long made Western Red Cedar the premier choice for either interior or exterior home use. Cedar fibers in the heartwood contain natural preservatives that are toxic to decay-causing fungi. The two principal extractives that are responsible for the decay resistance are Thujaplicans and water-soluble phenolics. The tree's ability to produce these extractives increases with age, making the outer regions of heartwood the most durable.

Flame Spread and Smoke Development Ratings Western Red Cedar has flame spread and smoke development classifications that are superior to the minimums set by most building codes, which permit the use of cedar heartwood without preservative treatments.

All-Weather Western Red Cedar is one of the few wood species that are naturally at home in the outdoors. Properly finished, Western Red Cedar will last for decades, even in harsh environments. Its natural resistance to moisture, decay and insect damage make it the ideal choice for a surface that is exposed to sun, rain, heat and cold all year round.

BEAUTY

For centuries builders and artisans have valued Western Red Cedar for its natural beauty and durability.

Architectural design - Cedar compliments any architectural design - from turn-of-the-century to contemporary.

Colours - Unfinished cedar has richly textured grain with colours ranging from mellow ambers, reddish cinnamons and rich sienna browns. Its warm coloring is complimented by a uniform, fine-grained texture with a satin luster.

Easy finishing - Because cedar is virtually pitch and resin free, the wood easily accepts a range of finishes, from fine oils and stains, to solid coatings and paint.

Usages - Enhance the beauty and elegance of your home or commerical property with cedar siding, decking, moulding, windows, doors, posts, beams, paneling, outdoor projects, interiors and saunas.

Aroma - Cedar's unique aroma comes from naturally occurring thujaplicins in its heartwood. These compounds resist moisture and are toxic to decay-causing fungi and insects and preserve the wood to give it long lasting appeal.

Acoustic insulation - Acoustic properties of cedar walls and ceilings provide sound insulation necessary to quieten rooms. Surround yourself in the beauty of cedar.

HISTORY

The hallmark characteristic of Western Red Cedar, its natural durability, has preserved examples of native culture for more than 100 years.

B.C.'s Pacific Coast Aboriginal People Western Red Cedar, a wood with roots of use that date back centuries to the Native Americans who first named it the "Tree of Life."

First Uses of Cedar Bark and Logs Along B.C.'s Pacific Coast, aboriginal people have used cedar bark to make rope, clothing and baskets for thousands of years. The logs are used for a variety of purposes, including canoes, totem poles, masks and long houses. Native Americans would also remove large slabs of outer bark from living trees for roofing materials or cut a rectangular hole into a tree to test its soundness before cutting it for a canoe or totem pole.

Working Together to Preserve Heritage Trees that have been scarred due to a First Nation's cultural activity are known as culturally modified trees. Those trees with modifications that pre-date 1846 are considered archeological sites and are protected under the Heritage Conservation Act. Forest companies frequently take steps to help First Nations obtain cedar logs or other species from their harvest for traditional or cultural uses.

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